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by leaving town before making a deal on the fiscal cliff. what's going on? if you take an aspirin to prevent heart trouble check the labor. our own dr. sanjay gupta tells us what a new study says about the effects of coated tablets. we'll also hear what happened during in flight emergency during one of the world's newest high-tech planes. i'm wolf blitzer, you're in the situation room. >>> with just 27 days to go until all of us are hit with tax increases, takes it across the board a cut of $55 billion. people have it in their power to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff aren't negotiating, they're not debating right now, so many of them simply leaving town. but there's more going on than meets the eye. let's bring in our senior congressional correspondent dana basch, she has the latest. >> reporter: there's so much political theater around here right now, you could say tickets. one of today's acts was the house leaving. lawmakers streaming out of the capitol hill, racing to their cars to get to the airport and go home. it's a scene you usually see on a thursday afternoon or friday morning, not
coast. and we are at 27. the number of days before the nation is going to slip over the fiscal cliff and that is what people are talking about. unfortunately, in washington they are not talking to each other about it. right now president obama is meeting with the washington business roundtable. that's just minutes after speaker boehner met with rank and file gop lawmakers and former speaker pelosi met with house democrats. they are all in each other's corners speaking amongst each other but all eyes are on the fiscal cliff. let's scoot over to the president. easy merging from that meeting with the washington business leaders. let's see what he has to say. >> jim, thanks for your leadership. you know, originally my team had prepared some remarks, they always get nervous when i'm out there on my own, never know what i might say. but given the dialogue that we had the last time, i thought it was useful for me to abbreviate my remarks, speak off the cuff at the top and then most of the time just having a conversation. let me begin by saying all of you in this room are not just business l
to "hardball." today president obama again made clear there will be no deal to avert the so-called fiscal cliff without the rich paying a higher tax rate. got it? higher rate. in this interview on bloomberg tv, he made it. let's listen. >> the issue right now that's relevant is the acknowledgment that if we're going to raise revenues that are sufficient to balance with the very tough cuts that we've already made and the further reforms in entitlements that i'm prepared to make, that we're going to have to see the rates on the top 2% go up, and we're not going to be able to get a deal without it. >> there you heard it again, top rates have to go up, and rates. and some republicans are saying that the gop will ultimately say uncle. conservative columnist byron york, a very smart guy, wrote, quote, republicans will cave on the question of raising the tax rate for the highest income americans. the only question is whether they do so before or after the government goes over the so-called fiscal cliff. "new york times" columnist david brooks describes it this way. republicans will be raising middle c
left to make a deal before the country hits what's called the fiscal cliff. that's a combination of across the board tax increases for everyone, coupled with cuts in spending like defense, education, health care, and housing assistance. let's go live to our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin with the very latest. jessica? >> reporter: president obama has now personally turned down speaker boehner's opening offer to avert the fiscal cliff. he did it in a tv interview. what does president obama think of speaker boehner's proposal to avert the fiscal cliff? >> unfortunately, the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. he talks about $800 billion worth of revenues but says he's going to do that by lowering rates. when you look at the math, it doesn't work. >> reporter: he won't agree to eliminate a tax deduction for contributions to charity. >> every hospital and university and nonfor profit agency across the country would find themselves on the verge of collapse. so that's not a realistic option. >> reporter: but the president didn't say all this to speaker
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)